As a parent, you want to ensure the best for your children.  You take them to the most trusted doctors and pediatricians, you send them to reputable schools, and you protect their physical well-being.  However, many parents are not aware of one of the most common difficulties facing children and adolescents; Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (AD/HD).

Can you feel it? That slight dip in temperatures and the deepening of the blue skies that signals the official arrival of fall in Alabama? It’s a feeling that’s indescribable, and positively exhilarating. And it moves many of us to fling open our doors, lace up some hiking boots and set off into the great outdoors, in search of adventure (or just beautiful scenery).

Southeastern Outings, a non-profit organization which sponsors outdoor outings, has a lot lined up this month. All of these activities are open to the public. The events include easy day hikes, bicycle rides, and more – exploring some of the most scenic spots in Alabama.

Here is this month’s Southeastern Outings Calendar of Events. For more information, visit seoutings.org. Have fun!

By Stan J. Griffin: October 3, 2016

After evaluating the film of Saturday's 34-6 homecoming win by the No. 1 Alabama football team over Kentucky, Crimson Tide coach Nick Saban said Monday that he saw his team execute much better in the second half after a somewhat sloppy first half where it stopped itself on numerous occasions with items such as dropped balls, missed assignments and general gaffes in terms of execution.
Saban said the overall good news for his 5-0 team, however, is that he is continuing to see steady improvement from it.
"We need to play better over and over and over again, especially when you play better teams," he said. "I think we had some outstanding performances in (Saturday's) game and I think our team is making progress, but I think we need to continue to do that, continue to work as every week in the SEC, you've got a real challenge and a real test."
Continuing to polish its overall game, while also continuing to trim its number of mistakes, will no doubt be crucial as Alabama enters into what will likely be a defining stretch of league games that includes showdowns with No. 9 Tennessee, No. 8 Texas A&M and LSU.
That grueling road begins this week with a road game against the No. 16/18 Arkansas Razorbacks (6 p.m., ESPN), and Saban said he feels Bret Bielema's squad is a "really, really good team."
The Razorbacks are 4-1 overall and 0-1 in Southeastern Conference play, with their only loss to No. 8 Texas A&M.

By Stan J. Griffin: October 1, 2016

After a week of having to cope with a great deal of outside noise, the No. 1 Alabama football team was no doubt hoping the magic and charm of Homecoming would be just the elixir it would need to get back on positive footing as it faced off against Mark Stoops' Kentucky Wildcats Saturday night at Bryant-Denny Stadium.
And thanks to the offensive trio of Jalen Hurts, Calvin Ridley and Joshua Jacobs, all freshmen and sophomores by the way, and another smothering effort by the UA defense, Alabama shook off a slow and sloppy start to roll 34-6 in front of a capacity crowd 101,821.
Alabama improved to 5-0 overall on the season, as well as 2-0 in Southeastern Conference play, while the visiting Wildcats fell to 2-3 overall and 1-2 in league play.
Hurts led the Tide offense by completing 20 of 33 passes for 262 yards and a pair of touchdowns while also carrying the ball nine times for 25 yards. Ridley, his main weapon on the evening, hauled in a career-best 11 throws for 174 yards and a pair of scoring receptions.
Jacobs, meanwhile, gained his first 100-yard game on the collegiate ranks as he carried the ball 16 times for 100 yards and a TD. He also caught three passes for 44 yards, including a long reception of 23 yards.
“I thought we executed a little better in the second half, I thought we were a little sloppy in the first half,” said Tide coach Nick Saban after the game. “I thought the defense played well and I thought it was a pretty good win for us. I thought we left some points out there by not finishing some drives. There are certainly a lot of lessons to be learned from this game. We have to be more consistent in the passing game. Things like that we just have to continue to work on.”

This week, Alabama students will join over 8,000 other Family, Career and Community Leaders of America (FCCLA) members at California’s San Diego Convention Center to participate in the 2016 FCCLA National Leadership Conference (NLC).
 
The FCCLA NLC provides wonderful opportunities for students to compete in national competitions, gain valuable leadership skills, explore interesting career pathways, have fun making new friends, and be inspired by some of our nation’s leading professionals and top motivational speakers. The theme of this year’s conference is “Empowered.”

Regions Field is up for it's second consecutive title as the the Best AA baseball field in the U.S.

Whether it's the great food, the fun kid's activities like the playground and batting cages or the good vantage points from all the seats,  show your appreciation for Regions Field by voting for this Birmingham gem.

To vote, click here.  Go Barons!

 

Here is a list of public boat launches closest to Birmingham.  Most are within an hour’s drive time.  We included Lake Martin because so many Birminghamians use Lake Martin regularly.  For a complete list of boat launches in Alabama, click here.

Most of these boat launches have one or two lanes. Almost none have public bathrooms, so make arrangements accordingly.

Don’t forget that you need a valid Alabama boater’s license. You can take an online course to get your license or go to the license office for a test.

If you just want to go fishing and aren’t launching a boat, don’t forget Lake Purdy down 280.  Note: The Lake Purdy phone line is broken and they can't run the credit card machine, so take cash this weekend.

 

BOAT RAMP

WATER BODY

Claiborne (Hwy. 84 Lndg.)

Alabama River

Sprott Landing

Cahaba River

B.B. Comer Bridge

Guntersville

Beech Creek

Guntersville

Brown's Creek (Warrenton)

Guntersville

Claysville

Guntersville

Crow Creek

Guntersville

Honeycomb Creek

Guntersville

Langston

Guntersville

Long Island

Guntersville

Mink Creek

Guntersville

Minky Creek

Guntersville

Mud Creek (G'ville)

Guntersville

North Sauty Creek

Guntersville

Scottsboro City Park

Guntersville

South Sauty Creek

Guntersville

Stevenson (Snodgrass Bridge)

Guntersville

Tom Jackson Park

Guntersville

Town Creek (G'ville)

Guntersville

Val Monte Rd. (Bucky Howe)

Guntersville

Waterfront

Guntersville

Beeswax Creek

Lay

Childersburg Access (Hollywood)

Lay

Flatlands (Pineview)

Lay

Glover's Ferry

Lay

Hidden Valley (Paint Creek)

Lay

Kelly Creek

Lay

The Narrows (Co. Rd. 400)

Lay

Kowaliga

Martin

Madwin Creek (Windy Point)

Martin

Pace's Point (Pleasure Point)

Martin

Smith Mountain Landing

Martin

Young's Landing (D.A.R.E. Park)

Martin

Higgins Ferry

Mitchell

Riverview Access

Oliver (Black Warrior)

Lion's Park (Lick Creek)

Smith

Smith Lake Dam

Smith

Smith Lake Park

Smith

Binion Creek

Tuscaloosa

Foster's Ferry

Warrior

Moundville Access

Warrior

It’s a summer holiday weekend and in Alabama and that means barbeque.  And by barbeque, we mean pulled pork.   We spice it up with ribs and maybe some chicken, but pulled pork is where it’s at.  

The great thing about pulled pork is that it is inexpensive, reheats beautifully, feeds a crowd and pretty much everyone loves it.  Oh, and it’s gluten free if you use a gluten free barbeque sauce (which many are) and paleo in its natural state.  So Brooke can eat it with her salad and stay on her diet.

When I was growing up at the lake with my family, my grandmother always made ice cream.

There are fancy cooked creams and  whipped things in many ice cream recipes, but my absolute favorite was a light and almost fizzy ice cream that my Nanny made with store brand strawberry soda and condensed milk.

This recipe uses that same technique (which is dead easy) and a made in Alabama favorite, Grapico.   The little girls will adore the lilac color and the flavor is light and fun. 

Today’s guest blogger is Charles Kinnaird.  If you’d like to be a guest blogger, please click here.

We are bombarded with news of political discord at the local, state, and national level. One can get disheartened watching news broadcasts these days, wondering if we can safely navigate the political shoals ahead. Recently I found a place where everything seemed to be working, in spite of what the news media may report.

 I received a summons to jury duty which led to an opportunity to walk the downtown city blocks of Birmingham at lunch time. During that short walk, I re-discovered the city and found a vibrant and hopeful America.

The University of Alabama can add yet another national championship to its collection, and the most recent one was captured by a very special group indeed.

Special Olympics College at UA, which is a Unified Sport student club, recently claimed the National Intramural-Recreational Sports Association Unified Basketball title, as it defeated Central Michigan 51-43 in Columbus, Ohio to take victory in the division's inaugural title tilt.

One of the biggest events of the year in Birmingham golf, the Regions Classic, starts today.  Here's a quick listing of events, whether you go to Greystone to see it first hand (one day tickets are $20) or check the action out from the comfort of your couch.

Friday, May 20 Military Outreach Day - Pairings & Tee Times

* PLEASE NOTE THAT FRIDAY'S ROUND WILL BE A TWO TEE START

Saturday, May 21

Sunday, May 22

*Gates open 7:00 a.m. everyday

** All times central

For more information, click here.

Free jazz in the parks of Birmingham.  Laying out on blankets on the green, letting the music wash over you. There is probably nothing better.  Thanks to Magic City Smooth Jazz there are free jazz concerts in Birmingham and around the state. 

Magic City Smooth Jazz is a non-profit  dedicated to enhancing cultural activities through various styles of jazz in the State of Alabama.  Since its inception in 2008, Magic City Smooth Jazz has hosted over 75 FREE concerts to the public while presenting over 275 emerging and established artists while impacting the lives of over 20,000 adults and children.  

Next in Birmingham, Kim Scott at Huffman High School and  Soul Collaboration (pictured above) at Avondale Park on June 5th plus more concerts throughout the summer.

 

Birmingham is covered up with farmer's markets.   Pepper Place Market downtown on Saturdays is the grandaddy of them all, but there are markets in East Lake, two in Homewood, and at the Summit. There are also markets springing up at churches, like the Wednesday morning market at Vestavia Methodist and markets at workplaces like the Kirklin Clinic, UAB and Southern Nuclear, to name a few.

This week, look for:

  • Greens
  • Herbs
  • Cauliflower
  • Strawberries
  • Beets
  • Cabbage
  • Onions (all kinds)
  • Radishes
  • Peas
  • Blueberries
  • Cucumbers
  • New Potatoes

Farmer's markets are also great for trying out new jams, breads and local honey.

Last year who would have predicted that Donald Trump might win the Republican Primary?

Last year who would have thought that Bernie Sanders would still be giving Hillary Clinton heartburn?

People have become so unhappy with the status quo that they are willing to vote for outsiders and non-traditional candidates.

It’s become totally impossible to predict elections and that may be true for Birmingham also.

 

I was energized to write this piece because of a comment made by a ComebackTown guest blogger last week.

He predicted that African-Americans will control Birmingham’s government for the rest of our lifetime.

I’m not so sure.

Birmingham voters might consider electing  a Mayor of either race if the candidate presented solid ideas that could transform Birmingham neighborhoods, schools, public transportation, and increase jobs and wages.

Birmingham is 73% African-American, but I believe blacks would be open to a candidate who might improve their lives.

Sadiq Khan was just elected Mayor of London England.  He’s the first Muslim mayor of any Western capital city–which is truly remarkable since Muslim’s represent only 12% of London’s population.

Barack Obama won the presidency in 2008 and 2012 with a U.S black population of  also about 12%.  Obviously many non-African Americans voted for him.

And this year’s presidential primaries have been totally unpredictable.

No one would have thought Donald Trump, a previous Democrat, billionaire and reality TV star, would defeat 16 Tea Party, conservative, traditional, and Evangelical candidates to be the presumptive Presidential nominee of the Republican party.

How do you explain Bernie Sanders, a 74 year old Jewish social democrat who had not even been a Democrat, mobilizing young folks 1/2 or 1/3 his age to give Hillary Clinton many sleepless nights?

I want to emphasize that I’m not saying a white mayor would be better than a black mayor.

And I’m not maligning the current administration.  Birmingham has made more progress in the last few years than in the previous twenty.

No candidate should be excluded from consideration because of his/her race.  I’m sure most people, and certainly African-Americans, would agree.

The Mayoral and City Council elections are next year.

I don’t know if a strong non-black candidate will be brave enough to step forward to lead Birmingham.  Maybe not.

But I do know that Birmingham citizens deserve options.

Let’s turn Birmingham around.  Click here to sign up for our newsletter.  There’s power in numbers. (Opt out at any time)

David Sher is Co-Founder of AmSher Compassionate Collections.  He’s past Chairman of the Birmingham Regional Chamber of Commerce (BBA), Operation New Birmingham (REV Birmingham), and the City Action Partnership (CAP).

After 30 years of studying and coaching successful entrepreneurs, I’ve noticed that the most successful tend to have four habits in common, and these are things you can and should put into practice yourself.  The first three are succinctly outlined in Optimize for Growth:  How to Scale Up Your Business, Your Network, and You, written by my friend, Jonathan B. Smith.  You really should get this book; it’s a quick read, and it will explain how these practices work in concert with one another, and inspire you to make them part of your standard M.O.

Here are the four most important things you can do to become a top entrepreneur:

1. Get your business on an OPERATING SYSTEM.
No, I’m not talking about software; I’m talking about what Coach Nick Saban would call his “Process.” It’s a human system of disciplines and practices that gets and keeps everyone “on the same page.”  My favorite system is EOS, of course, but there are others, and to make your business the best it can possibly be, you must have one and you must use it.  Having a common vocabulary, a common method of problem-solving, a common set of processes and practices, and a shared mission – all of which permeate every level of your organization – is essential to creating a culture of achievement and sustainable success in your company.

2. Join and actively participate in a business-focused PEER NETWORK.
Most entrepreneurs feel a certain sense of loneliness as leaders bearing a heavy responsibility for their companies, employees, and families. As the saying goes, “Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown.”  But members of peer groups tend not to feel so alone.  Spending time with others in the same situation, listening to one another’s experiences and sharing your own, helps you gain perspective, learn key skills, and solve problems.  I can’t count how many times a member of such a group has told me a story of how he had a perplexing problem weighing on his mind continually, and his peer group helped him find a solution in a single discussion.

Formalized programs include EO (Entrepreneurs Organization), Vistage, YPO (Young President’s Organization, WPO (Women’s President’s Organization), and even faith-based CEO Peer Groups like Truth@Work and Convene.  All of these require members to sign non-disclosure agreements, so they create a safe place to be open and honest about the challenges you’re facing.   Here is a handy article that will guide you in choosing a peer group that’s right for you.

3. Get COACHING.
I’ve used many coaches to help me learn the skills I needed to make breakthroughs in my career; life coaches, executive coaches, spiritual coaches, employment search coaches, and those who specialize in coaching sales, operations, finance, etc. Yes, I am a coach myself, which goes to show that even coaches need coaching!

Here’s an article that will help you start looking for a coach, but here’s one more key that is paramount to making coaching work for you:  no coach can ever take you farther than he has traveled himself.  Always look for coaches who have already achieved what you aspire to.  Once you reach that level, seek an even more accomplished coach to take you even higher.

4. Get yourself focused for TODAY.
Effective strategy execution always comes down to a choice, not only of what you will DO today or this week/month/quarter, but just as importantly, what you will NOT do; what you’ll say “no” to so you can say “yes” to other things that really matter.  EOS tools like the Vision/Traction Organizer™, Delegate and Elevate™, and the Clarity Break™help me eliminate distractive or less productive activities and keep my efforts razor-focused on the actions that will get me where I want to go.   For daily organization, I like the discipline that Stephen Covey popularized, the Eisenhower Decision Matrix Grid.

Think of a famous entrepreneur you admire.  I’ll guarantee you that person uses the resources and disciplines I’ve covered here.  It may seem like a lot to start with, but running a business is a big job in itself, and doing it better than everybody else requires the use of potent strategies like this, which in the end, make a big job a whole lot easier.

A recent article in the Washington Post talked about the millennials tendency to eschew their parent’s furniture and belongings.  It is the time of the great de-cluttering that everyone knew would come as the Baby Boom generation ages. 

However, the Boomer's  children are even less interested in their second hand furniture than expected. This has created a large second hand furniture market all across the United States.   This may due to a simply differences in taste which are magnified by the sheer size of the two demographics. But there is a thought that the Millennial generation is simply….into simple.  Thus less stuff.  And it's driving the cost of furniture down in the second hand market.

Regardless of the reasons, Birmingham, like most cities, is a bargain hunter’s dream.  Especially if you like dark wood furniture. Or if you want good quality wood furniture to update with paint ala Joanna Gaines (from HGTV’s  Fixer Upper) or for those who love the shabby chic look.

Craigslist’s Birmingham section is the most ubiquitous site for second hand furniture.  But a number of local trading sites have become go to spots for bargain hunters.

Facebook sites like Mountain Brook Trading, Vestavia Trading, Gardendale Online Yardsale and Hoover Trading fill member’s Facebook feeds with pictures of antique chairs, armoires and dining room suites at a fraction of the original prices.   These groups have  big membership.  Mountain Brook Trading has over 31,000 members, Vestavia Trading has almost 47,000.   Even a Hoover Trading dedicated to kid's clothes only has almost 5,000 members.

Consignment stores are also filled with furniture, ranging from the antique to the almost new.  Stores like Encore Resales and Classic Home Décor Consignment (both in Pelham)  offer used furniture in a showroom setting and perks like delivery.

Some furniture can be had for...free.  There are "free to whoever will pick up"  sites like Freecycle that have active groups in Birmingham.

It’s just interesting how the Baby Boomer generation continues to sway the overall fortunes of so many industries in the US as a function of their size. The furniture industry is no different.

The International Baccalaureate Program in Jefferson County has been enormously successful and is one the top rated programs in the country.  Next year the program will expand to include middle school students.  The deadline for applications is tomorrow, May, 20, 2016.

The temporary site for the middle grades program will be at the current  Pleasant Grove Middle School campus.  The school plans to find a more centrally located spot in the next three years.

Jefferson County will provide limited transportation similar to the hub routes currently used by JCIB.  Jefferson County is seeking the interest level of students who wish to apply to the middle grades program.

The program is still in the final stages of approval.   The administrators hope to have final approval for the program within the next several weeks.   JCIB was recently ranked first in Alabama and 8th in the U.S. in the 2016 Washington Post study of America's Most Challenging High Schools.  The program has also been rated in the top 10 of Best High School’s in America by Newsweek many times over the last decade.

Students will be notified regarding acceptance status by June 17, 2016.

For more information, click here.

A veteran Jefferson County School System educator who draws inspiration from teaching high school students and who values working with teachers in training because of the power to affect change is the 2016-2017 Alabama Teacher of the Year.

Dana Jacobson, who has taught English at Clay-Chalkville High School since 1999, will serve as the state’s ambassador for public education and the teaching profession throughout the upcoming school year. A graduate of Smith College and the University of Alabama at Birmingham, Jacobson automatically becomes Alabama’s nominee for National Teacher of the Year.

“Teachers are visionaries who see that light at the end of the tunnel and find ways to help students get to that light,” said Jacobson, who, as the Alabama Teacher of the Year, hopes to motivate more people to enter the education field. “There’s nothing better than to see a student growing, and there’s no job to me more important than teaching because we pave the way for all sorts of possibilities for students.”

Interim State Superintendent of Education Dr. Philip Cleveland announced Jacobson was chosen to serve as the official spokesperson and representative for teachers in Alabama for the next year near the end of a celebration honoring the 12 semi-finalists and 4 finalists who were nominated for the coveted title. The awards ceremony is held annually in recognition of these teachers’ dedication to education in Alabama public schools.

 

Cleveland expressed his gratitude to all of the district finalists for their hard work, innovation and compassion, which he said are reflected daily in the accomplishments of their students. He said the honorees are not only role models for the students of Alabama, but for their peers as well.

Of Jacobson, Cleveland said, “Dana Jacobson exemplifies the ability of an educator to shape and change lives. She strives to connect with and engage each individual student who enters her classroom and, as such, has been able to provide meaningful, quality learning to tomorrow’s leaders.  We are proud to have Ms. Jacobson represent our state as the 2016-2017 Alabama Teacher of the Year.”

In addition to English, Jacobson teachers ACT Prep, Debate, Speech, Creative Writing, and History of Film, among other subjects. She designs classroom activities so that students can make connections and strives to model those characteristics she believes the world requires: an interest in learning and people; a validation of others, not just tolerance; a desire to solve problems; and a strong work ethic.

Clay-Chalkville High School Principal Michael Lee said Jacobson embodies those qualities and more: “On most days, Ms. Jacobson is the first teacher at school and the last to leave. She does not stop. She is a true giver to students, student teachers, and colleagues.”

Dawn Davis, a fourth-grade teacher at Montana Street Academic Magnet School in the Dothan City School System, is the 2016-2017 Alternate State Teacher of the Year.

The first among her siblings to go to a four-year college, Davis, who earned both her bachelor’s and master’s degrees in Elementary Education from Troy University, has spent most of her 20-plus years as an educator teaching in the Dothan City School System. She believes that while she cannot change the many circumstances from which her students come, she can change where they are going in life.

Davis aims to do so by creating a classroom environment where all children realize their worth and potential, which she accomplishes through planning, building a support team, encouraging risk-taking, and utilizing her student’s natural curiosity.

“My greatest rewards from teaching come in the form of a smile,” Davis said. “When you see a smile cross the face of a child, you know he/she is gaining in knowledge. I am not interested in perfecting students, but I am greatly determined to perfect my abilities to encourage goal-based mindsets so that all children can realize their worth and potential.”

The selection process for Alabama’s Teacher of the Year begins at the school system level. Each school system can nominate an elementary and secondary teacher at the district level. One elementary teacher and one secondary teacher are selected from each of the eight state Board of Education districts. A state selection committee selects 4 teachers from the 16 district finalists to be interviewed for the titles Alabama Teacher of the Year and Alternate State Teacher of the Year.

 

There are two Birminghams.

At least two.

The historical reason for our two Birminghams is known to most of us.  Our history of racial segregation and economic colonialism is pretty widely known.  The result of Birmingham operating under those conditions for nearly all of its first 100 years, has left people of good intentions trying to overcome a terrible legacy–a legacy of unprincipled abuse leads to a world of fear and doubt and mistrust.

How can any white man, in a suit, be trusted?

And, that was an undercurrent of the message that I heard at the open City Council meeting held March 17th on the issue of consideration of proposed changes to the Mayor-Council Act of 1955.  The meeting was called to address the political question.  The political question quickly devolved into one of racial politics pitting whites (always described as Republican plantation owners) against blacks (always, citizens of Birmingham). (Never mind that I and other white citizens of Birmingham were in attendance in support of the City Council.)

And, it got worse.  Those who would support efforts to strip the City Council of its current authorities are reinstituting slavery—and if they are black folk doing so, they are Uncle Toms carrying the water for their white masters.  It was said—with a straight face– that whites are moving back into Birmingham to take over the control of the City from African-Americans. (Never mind that even if there was a conspiracy to do just that, the numbers are so disproportionate that such could never happen in our lifetimes.)  Inflammatory language was used that rivals any racist comments made anywhere and anytime—including a description of some whites who are moving back into the East Lake area being—“you know–not the kind of whites that are good for the area.”

I found this appalling.  And what was also appalling is that I did not hear one (of the so many) pastor’s voice raised to decry the depiction of this being a racial issue as opposed to what it was—a raw political power play that should be defeated. Expecting rationality in the midst of this heated political issue though is probably irrational itself.

But, what was even more appalling than this?  There was the utter lack of involvement and engagement of white business leadership of the City in attendance.  To my eye, there was not one white so-called “business leader” nor one white non-profit leader in attendance.  The message heard loud and clear by Birmingham’s black residents by the total absence of such white leadership, was “it’s not our problem” and “we don’t care.”

So, what is the legacy of two Birminghams?

The legacy of two Birminghams can be summed up simply as this: all of the development in the City Center, Lakeview and Avondale, including Regions Park, Railroad Park, new condominiums, new restaurants, do not directly address the need for help for the neighborhoods of Birmingham suffering economic decline.  Such development only attracts white people to come to the City to play and in some cases to live.

Both the Council and the Mayor are between a rock and a hard place.  The residents vote them into their jobs, and the residents want attention paid to their neighborhood infrastructure.  But, the Council and the Mayor understand that the revenue to do anything meaningful in the neighborhoods is dependent upon the growth of the City Center and entertainment districts such as Avondale, Lakeview and Uptown.  That is, the ad valorem tax base in the neighborhoods alone cannot sustain needed neighborhood improvements. (In FY 2015, the Revenues for the City were budgeted to be $390 million of which only $23 million [less than 6%] were to come from ad valorem property taxes).  So, no growth in sales tax and license fees, means no money to fund neighborhood infrastructure improvement.

Regrettably, today when a politician tries to explain the economic facts of life, that politician becomes the enemy of those who live in needy neighborhoods.

The goal for 2017 should be to get voters to see the larger picture.  Baking a bigger and better pie will drive revenues to the City Budget, so that the serious problems of blight, flooding and crime and schools can be tackled.  Then, it is a matter of electing people—regardless of race– who don’t have a vested interest in the jobs and contracts to be let to do the work—but only have a vested interest in having the work truly, properly and meaningfully accomplished for the good of the City and the residents of Birmingham.

The answer to “There are two Birminghams” must be “We are all in this together.”  We are going to succeed together or we are going to fail separately and miserably.  My hope and prayer is that there are enough people of good will who will encourage our resident citizens to lay aside their mistrust and leave racism in the trash bin where it belongs.

Maury Shevin—passionate about the City of Birmingham–lives, works, thinks and plays on Birmingham’s Southside.

Let’s turn Birmingham around.  Click here to sign up for our newsletter.  There’s power in numbers. (Opt out at any time)

David Sher is Co-Founder of AmSher Compassionate Collections.  He’s past Chairman of the Birmingham Regional Chamber of Commerce (BBA), Operation New Birmingham (REV Birmingham), and the City Action Partnership (CAP).

ComebackTown is published by David Sher to begin a discussion on a better Birmingham.

Today’s guest blogger is Maury Shevin.  If you’d like to be a guest blogger, please click here.

 

Birmingham Post-Herald (BPH) is Birmingham, Alabama's premier community newspaper, covering the great people, places and activities of the area.

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