How to Make Your Own Kokedama: Japanese Moss Balls

Kokedama, Japanese for ‘moss ball,’ describes these intriguing living spheres. This bonsai-related Japanese art form is centuries old. Despite their popularity in modern gardens, kokedama are like historical artefacts.

1. Mix The Soil

Soil should stick together but not be too dense to keep shape. The roots will suffocate in deep soil, preventing long-term plant survival. The goods you choose may require you to modify ratios.

2. Mold The Ball

Form a ball and gently press the top with both thumbs to create a plant root hole. It should reach the centre of the ball without splitting it in half. Reserve it for moulding your chosen plant.

3. Prepare The Plant

Form a ball and gently press the top with both thumbs to create a plant root hole. It should reach the centre of the ball without splitting it in half. Reserve it for moulding your chosen plant.

4. Wrap The Roots

Grab the ball you made earlier and gently lower the roots into the hole, spreading them out. You shouldn't plant deeper than the plant's container because the base can decay, spreading to the roots and foliage.

5. Cover With Moss

After soaking, squeeze out extra sphagnum moss and wrap it over the soil ball. Moss sheets around the ball make it simpler to hold together. Completely and evenly cover the ball with moss. 

6. Secure With Twine

Create an even twine pattern around the ball. The design doesn't matter much with transparent wire, but visible twine requires more care to avoid a sloppy ball. Continue wrapping until it holds together without help.

7. Kokedama Care

After finishing your project, don't leave it hanging. The plant needs regular care to stay happy and the moss green. The most critical step is watering the moss ball for 15 minutes and draining it before hanging or repositioning it.

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